Aleksander Goloshchapov

International Grandmaster
Professional Coach

Pull

My games

[Event "Oesterreich"] [Site "?"] [Date "2001.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "Goloshchapov, Aleksander"] [Black "Halasz, Tamas"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D31"] [WhiteElo "2550"] [BlackElo "2380"] [Annotator "Goloshchapov,A"] [PlyCount "53"] [EventDate "2001.??.??"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 c6 {The move is quite dubious as Black does not develop a piece, but the principled attempt to prove it's doubtfulness involves a central pawn sacrifice what leads to extremely complex positions with mutual chances.} 4. e4 $1 {I accept the challenge!} dxe4 5. Nxe4 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 $1 ({ Promises White no advantage the other less principled option} 6. Nc3 c5 7. a3 Ba5 8. Nf3 Nf6 9. Be3 Nc6 10. Qd3 cxd4 11. Nxd4 Ng4 $1 12. O-O-O Nxe3 13. fxe3 {in the game for the World crown Carlsen,M-Anand,V Chennai 2013 Magnus could not get anything from the opening, although finally outplayed his opponent in a long run} Qe7 $1) 6... Qxd4 $1 {The point of this gambit! Black is trying to prove the correctness of Aaron Nimcovich's statement "Take any central pawn if it can be done without too much danger". At the same time White is trying to prove the correctness of his other thought "A lead in development is an ideal!". What is more essential here?} 7. Bxb4 Qxe4+ 8. Be2 {Theoretical debates are going on in this position at the highest level, and Black manages to successfully defend generally quite dangerous positions.} Na6 $1 9. Ba5 $5 { One of the possible options here. The point of this move is to provoke 9...b6 and weaken this way the diagonal h1-a8.} ({A sharp discussion is going on after very attractive} 9. Bd6 {[%csl Gd6]} Qxg2 10. Qd2 e5 (10... Nf6 $5) 11. Bxe5 Bf5 (11... Qxh1 $2 12. O-O-O {[%cal Rd2d8,Re2f3]}) 12. Bf3 $1 (12. O-O-O Qe4) 12... Qg6 13. O-O-O Nc5 14. Qe3 {The danger of Black's positions in this system is obvious!} Bb1 $1 {Black demonstrates a lot of ingenuity to hold the position.} (14... Ne6 15. Ne2 $40) 15. Rd2 Bxa2 16. Bd6+ (16. Rd6 $5) 16... Ne6 17. Be4 Qh6 18. f4 Nf6 19. Nf3 Bxc4 20. Re1 O-O-O 21. Bxc6 $1 Ba6 $2 (21... bxc6 $1 22. Qxa7 Rxd6 $1 23. Qa8+ Kc7 24. Qa7+) 22. Ng5 $1 Nxg5 $2 23. Bd7+ $1 Kxd7 24. Qe7+ Kc6 25. Qc7+ {1-0 Bacrot,E-Morozevich,A Biel 2012}) ({Not that effective spectacular} 9. Bf8 Ne7 $1 10. Bxg7 Rg8 {Black takes over the initiative}) ({Another option is} 9. Bc3 f6 10. Qd6 Nh6 11. Bxf6 gxf6 12. O-O-O Qg6 13. Qd8+ Kf7 14. Qxh8 Nb4 15. Bh5 Nxa2+ 16. Kd2 Qxh5 17. Qxh7+ Kf8 18. Qh8+ Kf7 19. Qh7+ {with equality, Nakamura-Tomashevsky,2013}) 9... b6 {now White's light-squared bishop gets interesting prospects on the h1-a8 diagonal} ({The interesting alternative is} 9... f6 $5 10. Qd8+ $140 Kf7 11. O-O-O e5 {[%csl Rc1][%cal Gc8f5] with a very double edged game}) 10. Bc3 Ne7 (10... f6) 11. Nf3 ({Looks dubious} 11. Bxg7 $6 Rg8 {a lead in development and the initiative are passing to Black} ({but not} 11... Qxg2 $2 12. Bf6 Qxh1 13. Qd6 {and White wins } O-O 14. Qg3+ Ng6 15. Bf3)) 11... f6 12. O-O e5 $2 {Being behind in development Black makes another non-developing pawn move that turns out to be a very bad mistake. My dynamic advantage is obvious, but due to Black's advantage in the center the placement of his king looks safe on the first sight. To punish my opponent for breaking the general principles I must open up the center, acting herewith as energetically as possible!} ({Black should have removed his king from the center as quick as possible} 12... O-O $1 13. Re1 Qf4 14. b4 $1 {White has compensation but probably not more than that} Qc7 15. Qc2 e5 16. Bd3 Ng6 {Black equalizes thanks to his central e5-pawn.}) 13. Nxe5 $1 {The knight sacrifice enables me to absolutely crush opponents strong center and get all the other pieces into the game very quickly!} fxe5 14. Bh5+ $1 {This subtle check is the thing that makes the knight sacrifice work!} g6 { My opponent is forced to seriously weaken the dark squares, that deprives his king of a safe shelter on the kingside!} 15. Re1 {Development with a tempo!} Qh4 16. Bf3 $1 {The strongest and simply winning move! White can afford a quiet move in attack as the static balance has been changed in his favour. He already dominates in the center, Black's pawn structure is badly weakened so that his king can not find safe shelter even on the kingside. Apart from that, there are numerous tactical motifs in Black's camp and my attack develops very energetically - the pieces are joining in the attack with a tempo!} ({Does not give the desirable result the second piece sacrifice} 16. Rxe5 gxh5 17. Qd6 ( 17. g3 Rg8 18. Qd6 Rg6 (18... Bd7 19. Kh1 Rg6) 19. Qxg6+ hxg6 20. gxh4 Kf7 { Black is at least fine} 21. Rae1 Nf5 22. Re8 Nc7 23. Rh8 Ne6) (17. Qf3 Bd7 $1 { Black holds} 18. Re4 (18. g3 Rg8 $1) 18... Bg4 $1) 17... O-O $1 {the improvement of the game Najer-Geller, Sochi 2005, where Black lost after} ( 17... Bd7 $2 18. Rd1 O-O-O 19. Rxe7 Rhf8 20. f3 Qxc4 21. Rxd7 Qc5+ 22. Kf1 Qxd6 23. R7xd6 $16) 18. g3 Qf6 19. Rxe7 (19. Qxf6 Rxf6 20. Rxe7 Rf7 21. Re8+ Rf8 22. Re7) 19... Qxf2+ (19... Qxd6 $2 20. Rg7+ Kh8 21. Rg6+) 20. Kh1 Qf3+ 21. Kg1 Qf2+ $11) 16... O-O {Absolutely no dot help the other options either.} (16... Kf7 17. Qd6 $1 Rg8 18. Rxe5 {[%csl Ra8,Rc6,Re7,Rf7,Rh4][%cal Ga1e1] White dominates!}) (16... Bd7 17. Re4 $1 {first, making the position of Black's queen worse} Qh6 18. Rxe5 Rf8 19. Qd6 Rf7 20. Rae1 $18 (20. Rd1 Rd8 21. Rde1) 20... O-O-O 21. Rxe7) 17. Rxe5 {Black's position falls apart due to the lack of cooordination of his pieces and numerous tactical motifs in his camp.} Nc5 ( 17... Bf5 18. g3 $1 Qg5 19. h4 Qf6 20. Re3 $18) (17... Rxf3 18. Qxf3 Bf5 19. Rae1 $18) 18. g3 $1 {All with a tempo!} (18. Qd6 Ne6 19. Rxe6 Bxe6 20. Qxe6+ Rf7 21. Qe5 Kf8 22. Rd1 Qxc4 23. Rd7 (23. Qh8+ Ng8 24. Bxc6 Qxc6 25. Bb4+ Re7 26. Bxe7+ Kxe7 27. Qg7+ Ke6) 23... Qxa2 (23... Re8 24. Qh8+ Ng8 25. Bg7+) 24. Bg4 (24. g4)) 18... Qf6 19. Re3 {[%csl Gc3][%cal Rc3h8] The triumph of the dark square strategy! Black has no any defence to the killing threat of 20. Qd4! the very next move.} Nf5 (19... Qg5 20. Qd4 Ne6 21. Rxe6 $1) 20. Bxf6 Nxe3 21. fxe3 Rxf6 22. Bxc6 $1 {A small tactics at the end!} Bb7 23. Qd5+ Rf7 24. Rf1 Raf8 25. Bxb7 Nxb7 26. Rxf7 Rxf7 27. b4 $1 {"A lead in development is an ideal!" says Nimcovich is his "My system". I was very happy with this game as it proves Nimcovich's statement in a very instructive way!} 1-0
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