Aleksander Goloshchapov

International Grandmaster
FIDE Senior Trainer

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My young students crush strong GMs Part 2

My young students crush strong GMs Part 2 18 December 2020

Part 2

2013-2016 – Second wave of talents.

The second stage of my coaching career brings lots of good memories of cooperation with different talented players. Among them are Ankit Rajpara, SL. Narayanan and Shardul Gagare, who managed to become GMs under my guidance at the age of 19, 17 and 18 respectively.

In this post you will find 3 exciting dynamic games in which the youngsters completely smashed very strong GMs in a spectacular way.

My students beat GMs game 4

[Event "Hoogeveen Open"] [Site "?"] [Date "2015.10.18"] [Round "2"] [White "Gupta, Abhijeet"] [Black "Ankit"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D43"] [WhiteElo "2629"] [BlackElo "2467"] [Annotator "Alex"] [PlyCount "80"] {In this game Ankit demostrated his character and managed to take revenge on generally a very tough for him opponent. Take a look at how instructively it worked out!} 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 {The most principal choice! Abhijeet Gupta is known for his deep opening preparation.} dxc4 $1 {The challenge is accepted!} 7. e4 g5 8. Bg3 b5 9. Be2 Bb7 10. Qc2 $5 ( {The main line goes} 10. h4 g4 11. Ne5 h5 12. O-O) 10... Nbd7 11. Nd2 Qb6 12. Rd1 Be7 13. Nf1 {A novelty which turns out to be an unfortunate one. White is relocating his knight to its ideal e3-square but... Diagram [#]} ({Many games were played after} 13. a4 $1 a6 14. O-O Rc8 15. h3 {with good positional compensation for the pawn}) 13... b4 $1 {The right understanding of the position! White's last move is nice startegically, but it has clear dynamic drawbacks as it delays castling for two moves. Black acts energetically to exploit it!} 14. Na4 b3 $1 {That's the main point! This strong intermediate pawn move enables Black to seize the initiative.} (14... Qa5 15. Nd2 $1 { with some advantage for White}) 15. Qd2 (15. axb3 {Diagram [#]} Bb4+ $1 (15... cxb3 16. Qd2) 16. Nd2 cxb3 17. Qd3 Qb5 $1 {[%csl Ra4,Re4] with an advantage for Black}) 15... Qa6 $1 {Another imprortant move to maintain the initiative.} 16. axb3 $6 ({Better was} 16. Nc3 {trying to maintain the key e4-pawn} bxa2 17. Ra1 Bb4 $1 {[%csl Re4]} (17... c5 {[%csl Re4]} 18. d5 {Diagram [#]} (18. Rxa2 $140 Nxe4 $1) 18... Nxe4 $3 19. Nxe4 exd5 20. Ne3 $1 (20. Nc3 d4 21. Rxa2 Qg6 22. Nd1) 20... dxe4 21. O-O {[%csl Re8,Rf5] with compensation for the pawns due to Black's exposed king}) 18. f3 Nh5 (18... c5 19. Ne3 cxd4 20. Qxd4 { [%csl Ge4] with compensation}) 19. Ne3 Nxg3 20. hxg3 O-O-O {[%csl Rd4] with the initiative for Black on the dark squares}) 16... Nxe4 17. Qc2 (17. Qe3 c5 $1) 17... Qa5+ 18. Nd2 Nxg3 $1 {The dark squared bishop is very strong and has to be eliminated.} 19. hxg3 cxb3 20. Qxb3 Rb8 21. Qc2 ({More stubborn was the developing} 21. O-O $1 Ba6 22. Nc4 $3 Qb4 (22... Bxc4 23. Qxc4 Rb4 24. Qxc6 Qxa4 25. Qc8+ Bd8 26. Ra1 Qb3 27. Rxa7) 23. Qc2 Qb3 $1 24. Qxb3 Rxb3 25. Na5 Bxe2 26. Nxb3 O-O {with still good winning chances for Black}) 21... c5 { [%csl Gb7] The energy of the Black pieces is getting released.} 22. d5 (22. O-O cxd4) 22... exd5 $1 {[%csl Gc5,Gd5] Finally it is Black who gets great control over the center. White does not have any real compensation for the pawns and his position is lost.} 23. Nc3 Nf6 24. Qf5 (24. O-O O-O) 24... Qb6 25. Kf1 $6 ( {Better was to complete development} 25. O-O O-O 26. Bf3 Rfd8 {[%cal Ge7f8, Gf8g7] although Black should be able to convert his decisive advantage without problems}) 25... Kf8 $1 26. Re1 Bc8 27. Qc2 Qxb2 28. Qd3 c4 29. Qd4 Qb6 $1 { Black needs to exchange the queens to prevent any kind of counterplay.} 30. Qe5 Qd6 31. Qd4 Be6 32. f4 Kg7 33. Nf3 Qc5 34. Qd2 Ne4 35. Nxe4 dxe4 36. Nd4 c3 37. Nxe6+ fxe6 38. Qc2 Qd4 39. Rd1 Rb2 $1 40. Qc1 Rd2 {[%csl Rf1] This game made me happy as a coach not only because Ankit won the phychological battle, but the way he did it. Being of a positional nature player, he proved that he made good progress in dynamic area as well!} 0-1

My students beat GMs game 5

[Event "Isle of Man International 2016"] [Site "Douglas/Isle of Man"] [Date "2016.10.07"] [Round "7"] [White "Narayanan, S L."] [Black "Movsesian, Sergei"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E11"] [WhiteElo "2536"] [BlackElo "2677"] [Annotator "Alex"] [PlyCount "53"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [EventType "swiss"] [EventCountry "GBR"] [SourceTitle "playchess.com"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceQuality "1"] {Nanu, as close people call him, is definitely one of the most talented students of mine. It took less than 1,5 years for him to cover the distance from the IM title to GM, which is the best achievement among my students so far.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Bb4+ 4. Nbd2 O-O 5. a3 Be7 {[%csl Rd2]} ({ More active option is} 5... Bxd2+ 6. Qxd2 b6 7. e3 Bb7 8. Be2 d6 9. O-O Nbd7 10. b4 {[%csl Gc1,Ge2][%cal Gc1b2] although here White has an edge due to his pair of bishops} Ne4 (10... c5 11. Bb2 Qe7 12. Rfd1 {with a typical edge for White}) 11. Qc2 f5 $140 12. Bb2 Rf6 13. d5 $1 {flank attack should be countered in the center! White's chances are better.}) 6. e4 d6 {[%csl Rd2] Looks really passive, but it has some sense due to White's misplaced d2-knight. } 7. Bd3 Nbd7 8. O-O e5 9. b4 exd4 10. Nxd4 Re8 11. Bb2 Bf8 12. Qc2 c6 $6 { Diagram [#]} ({Black should have played} 12... a5 $1 {[%csl Ga8,Gc8] solving the problem of his queenside pieces development} 13. N4b3 (13. Bc3) 13... axb4 14. axb4 Rxa1 15. Rxa1 Ne5 16. Be2 {with a slightly worse but solid position for Black}) 13. N4b3 $1 {[%csl Ra8] A very strong prophylactic move that prevents Black's counteplay with ...a5 and keeps the a8-rook out of play} b6 ( 13... Ne5 14. Be2 d5 15. Rad1 $1 {[%csl Rd8] White is better}) 14. f4 $1 g6 15. Rae1 Bb7 {Diagram [#]} (15... Bg7 16. c5 $1 {and White increases his advantage} bxc5 17. bxc5 dxc5 18. Nc4) 16. e5 $1 {White's pieces are perfectly placed and it is time to act!} Nh5 17. c5 $1 {[%csl Rb7] A great positional move that keeps the b7-bishop out of play.} d5 18. f5 $1 {Advantage in the center and superiority in force provide White a huge attack on the kingside.} Qg5 (18... Bg7 19. e6 $1 fxe6 20. fxg6 Nhf6 21. gxh7+ Kh8 22. Nf3 {[%cal Gf3g5] and Black is helpless}) 19. Nf3 Qg4 20. e6 $1 {The decisive break!} fxe6 21. fxe6 Ndf6 ( 21... Rxe6 $2 22. h3) 22. h3 Qf4 (22... Qg3 23. Be5 $1 Nf4 24. Bxf6 Nxh3+ 25. Kh1) 23. Bxg6 $1 {It is time to involve Black's king into the game!} hxg6 24. Qxg6+ Bg7 25. Ng5 Qg3 26. Be5 Qh4 (26... Qxb3 27. Rxf6 Nxf6 28. Bxf6) 27. Nd4 $1 {[%cal Gd4f5] The final move is such aesthetic pleasure to play! A wonderful domination of White's pieces. A very typical game for the talented young man who was already a quite balanced and universal player in his teens.} 1-0

My students beat GMs game 6

[Event "Dubai Open "] [Site "?"] [Date "2016.04.16"] [Round "6"] [White "Shardul Gagare "] [Black "Kuzubov Yuriy"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D39"] [WhiteElo "2491"] [BlackElo "2638"] [Annotator "Alex"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2016.04.12"] {This game is a good of example of the importance of the opening preparation in modern chess.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. e4 Bb4 6. Bg5 c5 7. Bxc4 cxd4 8. Nxd4 Bxc3+ 9. bxc3 Qa5 10. Bxf6 Qxc3+ 11. Kf1 gxf6 12. Rc1 Qa5 13. h4 Ke7 {Surprisingly, to reach this well-known position, the GM spent almost 40 min, which is definitely unprofessional. Going for such double edged lines, one should remember the concrete moves and understand the ideas very well.} 14. Rh3 {Diagram [#]} Rd8 $2 {Looks natural and very ambitious as it develops the rook and pins the knight. And indeed this move was considered as a playable option to the main 14...Nc6 and was played by strong GMs including Vassily Ivanchuk... this game and the next shocking move change the evaluation. Diagram [#]} ({More flexible way was to develop the pieces is} 14... Nc6 $1 15. Nxc6+ bxc6 16. Rd3 Rd8 17. Rxd8 Qxd8 18. Qh5 Qd4 19. Kg1 Rb8 20. Bb3 {with dynamically balanced position}) 15. Re3 $3 $146 {[%csl Ge3,Re7] A great novelty, which simply refutes the last opponent's move! Suddenly Black's king gets in trouble as Black does not have a satifactory way to prevent 16.Nf5 threat.} ({Before this game White mostly played} 15. Rd3 Nc6 16. Nxc6+ bxc6 { with transposition to the main line}) 15... Rd6 {Diagram [#]} (15... Nc6 16. Nf5+ $3 exf5 (16... Kf8 17. Qh5 $1 {[%csl Rf7,Rf8]} Qd2 18. Rce1 Ne5 19. Bb3 { [%csl Rf6,Rf8,Rh7][%cal Gh5h6]}) 17. exf5+ Ne5 18. Qh5 $1 {[%csl Rf7] White finds new objects for attack} Kd6 (18... Kf8 19. Rxe5 {[%csl Rf7]}) (18... Rf8 19. f4) 19. Bb3 $1 Bd7 20. Qh6 Ke7 21. f4 {with the decisive attack}) (15... Kf8 16. Rd3 $1 {[%csl Rf8] to the known position with misplaced king on f8...} Ke7 {Diagram [#]} (16... Nc6 17. Nxc6 Rxd3 18. Nxa5) 17. e5 $3 {no chance for Black to breathe!} Nd7 (17... fxe5 18. Qh5 $1 {[%csl Re7][%cal Gh5g5,Gd4f5] with the decisive attack}) 18. Bxe6 fxe6 19. Nxe6 Kxe6 20. Qg4+ f5 (20... Ke7 21. Qg7+) (20... Kf7 21. e6+) 21. Rd6+ Kf7 22. Qh5+ Kg8 23. e6 {with a crushing attack} Rf8 24. e7) 16. Nf5+ $1 {White should act energetically before Black completes his development.} exf5 17. exf5+ Kd7 18. Be6+ $1 { That's the key check that maintains the momentum of the attack!} fxe6 19. fxe6+ Ke7 20. Qg4 Bxe6 21. Qg7+ Kd8 22. Qh8+ Ke7 23. Qxh7+ {It is useful to collect all the pawns before thinking about mating ideas.} Kd8 24. Qh8+ Kd7 25. Qg7+ Kd8 26. Qxf6+ Kd7 27. Qg7+ Kd8 28. Qf8+ Kd7 {Diagram [#]} 29. Rg3 $1 {The most strict and powerful, as Black does not have a chance to complete his development. Also it is very strong practically as Black is already in strong time trouble and has to make responsible and difficult decisions.} ({Less convincingly would be the prosaic} 29. Qc8+ Ke7 30. Qxb7+ Nd7 31. Qxa8 { as Black is able to complete his development preserving at least some practical chances}) 29... Bc4+ 30. Kg1 Qd5 ({Does not help} 30... Qd8 31. Rg7+ Kc8 32. Qf5+ Rd7 33. Rxc4+ Nc6 34. Rc1 Kc7 {Diagram [#]} (34... Qe8 35. Rd1) 35. Qf4+ Kc8 36. Qg4 Kc7 37. Qg3+ $1 Kc8 38. Rg8) 31. Rg7+ Kc6 32. Qc8+ Kb6 33. Qc7+ Ka6 34. Rxc4 {and still Black is not able to complete his development!} Qd1+ (34... Nd7 35. Ra4+ Kb5 36. Ra5+) 35. Kh2 Nd7 36. Rb4 (36. Rg3 $1 Rd3 37. Rb4) 36... b6 37. Rg3 Rd5 38. Ra3+ Ra5 39. Qc4+ Kb7 40. Rxa5 Qd6+ 41. g3 { A great game by Shardul that illustarates the callibre of his chess talent and potential for his professional chess career.} 1-0
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